A little bit country, a little bit first wave scandinavian black metal.

7th October 2011

Photo

()

7th October 2011

Photo

All cowboys are asymetrical.

All cowboys are asymetrical.

()

7th October 2011

Photo

()

4th October 2011

Post

Five words to describing my design aesthetic:

Passionate

Vital

Brutal

Majestic

Macabre

()

3rd October 2011

Photo

Mathias Nygard (turisas costume phase 2)
Note: I would really love to figure out who designs the costumes for this band. They manage to reference lots of historical periods without ever settling on one. Somehow military garb from the stone age to through world war two is referenced, along with mad max and han solo. Every hero, every scoundrel, everyone is in there.

Mathias Nygard (turisas costume phase 2)

Note: I would really love to figure out who designs the costumes for this band. They manage to reference lots of historical periods without ever settling on one. Somehow military garb from the stone age to through world war two is referenced, along with mad max and han solo. Every hero, every scoundrel, everyone is in there.

()

3rd October 2011

Photo

Mathias Nygard street clothes
I love seeing this photo in between the two in costume, mostly because if the character on stage had to dress himself in modern clothes, this is exactly what he would choose. There is a unity of spirit.

Mathias Nygard street clothes

I love seeing this photo in between the two in costume, mostly because if the character on stage had to dress himself in modern clothes, this is exactly what he would choose. There is a unity of spirit.

()

3rd October 2011

Photo

Matias Nygard (Turisas, costume phase 1)

Matias Nygard (Turisas, costume phase 1)

()

1st October 2011

Photo


The most famous object from Iron Age Britain
This torc was made with great skill and tremendous care in the first half of the first century BC. It is one of the most elaborate golden objects made in the ancient world. Not even Greek, Roman or Chinese gold workers living 2000 years ago made objects of this complexity.
The torc is made from just over a kilogram of gold mixed with silver. It is made from sixty-four threads. Each thread was 1.9 mm wide. Eight threads were twisted together at a time to make 8 separate ropes of metal. These were then twisted around each other to make the final torc. The ends of the torc were cast in moulds. The hollow ends were then welded onto the ropes.
The torc was found when the field at Ken Hill, Snettisham was ploughed in 1950. Other hoards were found in the same field in 1948 and 1990. The torc was buried tied together with a complete bracelet by another torc. A coin found in caught in the ropes of the Great Torc suggests the hoard was buried around 75 BC.

The most famous object from Iron Age Britain

This torc was made with great skill and tremendous care in the first half of the first century BC. It is one of the most elaborate golden objects made in the ancient world. Not even Greek, Roman or Chinese gold workers living 2000 years ago made objects of this complexity.

The torc is made from just over a kilogram of gold mixed with silver. It is made from sixty-four threads. Each thread was 1.9 mm wide. Eight threads were twisted together at a time to make 8 separate ropes of metal. These were then twisted around each other to make the final torc. The ends of the torc were cast in moulds. The hollow ends were then welded onto the ropes.

The torc was found when the field at Ken Hill, Snettisham was ploughed in 1950. Other hoards were found in the same field in 1948 and 1990. The torc was buried tied together with a complete bracelet by another torc. A coin found in caught in the ropes of the Great Torc suggests the hoard was buried around 75 BC.

()

1st October 2011

Photo


This once magnificent bronze hanging bowl is the largest of three found in 1939 in a richly furnished ship burial. The burial, probably of King Raedwald (599-624/5), Anglo-Saxon ruler of East Anglia, is the most lavishly equipped tomb surviving from the early middle ages. This bowl is an import from British peoples living beyond the Anglo-Saxon heartlands and was perhaps acquired as tribute or through a marriage alliance. Its discovery among other exotic imports of silver and bronze confirms that it was highly valued. The bowl was in Anglo-Saxon hands for some time because it was repaired using silver patches decorated in the local Anglo-Saxon style.
Hanging bowls were designed to be hung by hooked mounts from three or four rings fixed to the rim. Here the thin sheet bowl has elaborately ornamented and inlaid hook-mounts, with extra ornamental square mounts in between. There is a disc under the base and inside, uniquely, a free standing bronze fish that could rotate. Three colours of enamel were used: red, blue and pale green. Other glass was inlaid: some blue rods and bright patterns of millefiori. The curving lines and abstract patterns are typical of medieval Celtic art from Britain and Ireland and it has been argued that this bowl was made in Ireland.
The silvery (tinned) trout swimming inside is a clue to the bowl’s original use. It may have held water for hand washing after a feast, or perhaps something stronger for drinking.

This once magnificent bronze hanging bowl is the largest of three found in 1939 in a richly furnished ship burial. The burial, probably of King Raedwald (599-624/5), Anglo-Saxon ruler of East Anglia, is the most lavishly equipped tomb surviving from the early middle ages. This bowl is an import from British peoples living beyond the Anglo-Saxon heartlands and was perhaps acquired as tribute or through a marriage alliance. Its discovery among other exotic imports of silver and bronze confirms that it was highly valued. The bowl was in Anglo-Saxon hands for some time because it was repaired using silver patches decorated in the local Anglo-Saxon style.

Hanging bowls were designed to be hung by hooked mounts from three or four rings fixed to the rim. Here the thin sheet bowl has elaborately ornamented and inlaid hook-mounts, with extra ornamental square mounts in between. There is a disc under the base and inside, uniquely, a free standing bronze fish that could rotate. Three colours of enamel were used: red, blue and pale green. Other glass was inlaid: some blue rods and bright patterns of millefiori. The curving lines and abstract patterns are typical of medieval Celtic art from Britain and Ireland and it has been argued that this bowl was made in Ireland.

The silvery (tinned) trout swimming inside is a clue to the bowl’s original use. It may have held water for hand washing after a feast, or perhaps something stronger for drinking.

()

1st October 2011

Photo

()